The Enigma Of The Universe ► 4 ►A Critique ► I. What is Universe ► (B) Idealism Of Scientist And Jain View ► 1. Eddington’s View and Jain View ► Conclusion

Posted: 19.12.2014

We have tried to compare and contrast Eddington's view with the Jain view mainly from the metaphysical point of view. We may conclude the whole discussion in the following six points:

  1. On the basis of epistemological analysis Eddington accepts the existence of consciousness as the objective reality; the Jain metaphysics too agree with him by enumerating soul under the five ultimate realities of the universe.
  2. Eddington considers it impossible to know the objective reality viz., consciousness by the methods of physics; the Jain philosophy also believes that being a non-physical reality, soul cannot be perceived through sensory knowledge or external physical equipment. It can only be perceived through the perfect transcendental knowledge.
  3. Both the views assert that consciousness is the main source of all psychic and psychological phenomena such as perception, memory, thinking, emotions, etc.
  4. Eddington's contention that his 'Selective Subjectivism' represents the philosophy of physical science, does not seem to be true, for his philosophy is definitely tinted by his biased idealistic views.
  5. Eddington's view and the Jain view differ from each other regarding the reality of matter. Though both consider the external world as wholly objective and the physical world as partly objective and partly subjective, they disagree regarding the physical knowledge: whereas Eddington holds 'special facts' as partly objective, partly subjective and the laws of physics as wholly subjective, the Jain philosophy considers both as partly objective, partly subjective. Also Eddington's contention that the sensory qualities such as colour, taste, etc. are wholly subjective is not conceded by the Jain view.
  6. The modern physics has failed to apprehend the exact nature of the ultimate unit of matter. Thus, Eddington's philosophy is based on the imperfect knowledge of the modern physics. On the other hand the Jain seers have made assertions about the ultimate atom only after having perceived it directly through their transcendental knowledge. In fact, the Jain philosophy denies the possibility of perception of the ultimate atom through sensory equipment,[1] and hence, it cannot be revealed by the methods of physics.[2]
Footnotes:
[1]
[2]
Share this page on: