Posted: 14.07.2011
 
History of Digambar Terapanth This is a small Digambara sect opposed to image-worship and following a path of inner exploration through meditation. They are also called Terahapanthis. Banarsidass, an important lay Digambara leader in the seventeenth century, came under the influence of Kundakunda's Essence of the Doctrine, written in the second or third century CE, and the monk Nemicandra's Essence of Gomata, a...
Posted: 12.07.2011
 
History and Doctrine of Sthanakvasi 1. History In 1017 a movement of Shvetambara monks in the capital Saurashtra tried to break the power of the caityavasis, temple-dwelling monks, who governed the Jain community. This group, the vanavasi, forest-dwellers, partially succeeded by setting up their own community based more on traditional values. But it was with Lonka, a mysterious figure who lived in Gujarat in...
Posted: 12.07.2011
 
History and Doctrine of Shvetambar Terapanth 1. Doctrine Acarya Bhiksu took the concept of ahimsa, non-violence, to an extreme that alienated his sect from the Jain community. An important influence for the inspiration of both Terapanthi and Sthanakvasi doctrine came from Lonka, who lived in the fifteenth century. The Terapanthis follow some Sthanakvasi doctrine, including the permanent wearing of the muhpatti,...
Posted: 12.07.2011
 
History and Doctrine of Nav Terapanth 1. Doctrine The Nav Terapanth (New Terapanth) is the latest division within Jainism. When a harsh ascetic monastic order is supported by a wealthy commercial class laity there is the incipient danger of constant dissension and division, particularly when the ascetics attempt, as Acarya Tulsi of the Shvetambara Terapanthis has done, to reinterpret the ancient rigid tradition...
Posted: 12.07.2011
 
History and Doctrine of Kavi Panth 1. History Raychandbhai Mehta (1867-1901) was given the honorific name Srimad Rajacandra by his devotees, and the Kavi Panth is sometimes known by this name. He was born in Vavania, a small port in Gujarat, in a family that was part Hindu and part Jain. His grandfather was a devout Vaishnava and his mother a Sthanakvasi Jain (the Vaishnavas have always been vegetarians - in...
Posted: 12.07.2011
 
History and Doctrine of Kanji Swami Panth 1. History The Kanji Swami Panth is the most successful Jain movement in the present century, and Kanji Swami has been the reviver of Digambara Jainism in Gujarat and all India. Kanji Swami was born in 1889 in a village on the Kathiawar Peninsula of Gujarat. His family were Sthanakvasis, but he was orphaned when he was young. He searched for a teacher, taking initiation...
Posted: 07.07.2011
 
History and Doctrine of Bispanth 1. Doctrines Doctrinal differences between the Terapanthi and Bispanthi mong the Digambaras are essentially of a minor nature. Both sects are image-worshipping. Bispanthis worship the Jinas and other deities such as Bhairava, showing Shaiva ascetic influence. The main and important difference between them is the non-recognition by the Terapanthis of the bhattaraka system. This...
Posted: 07.07.2011
 
History and Doctrine of Taran Panth 1. Doctrines Taran Panth (or Taranpanthi) is one of the three major subsects of the Digambaras, the others being the Bispanth and the Terapanth (Digambara). The Taranpanthis follow the doctrine of their founder Tarana Svami or Tarana Tarana Svami, after whom the sect is named. The sect is also called Samaiyapantha because the adherents worship samaya, sacred books,...
Posted: 06.07.2011
 
History and Doctrines of Murtipujaka Jains 1. Doctrines Murtipujaka means 'image-worshipping,' and includes both Shvetambaras and Digambaras, so we have Shvetambara Murtipujakas and Digambara Murtipujakas. Murtipujakas are also known as Deravasis. This is a cult centred on temples with puja, worship, of Jina-images, other deities, yakshas and yakshis, and other celestial figures in the Jain pantheon (see...
Posted: 06.07.2011
 
History and Doctrine of Kharatara Gaccha 1. Doctrines Kharatara Gaccha is the second most important of the Shvetambara gacchas. One of the alternative names of the Kharatara Gaccha is the Vidhisangha, the Assembly based on Scriptural Injunction. The Kharatara approach to the ascetic life is through referral to the literal words of sacred texts. The Kharataras live outside the temples and the temple-dwelling...
Posted: 06.07.2011
 
History and Doctrine of Tapa Gaccha 1. Doctrines Tapa Gaccha is the most important and numerous image-worshipping Shvetambara sect. In medieval times within Jainism a number of gacchas, sub-groups, grew among the Shvetambaras. Differences between these gacchas are usually of a minor nature, and the formation of the gaccha was based mainly on local communities or through following a Jain holy man. In the...
Posted: 30.03.2011
 
History of the Oswal Community 1. Oswal Ancestry The origin of the name "Oshwal" is probably tied to a small village in the Indian State of Rajasthan named Ossiya. There was once a large city at the site of Ossiya. The ancient names by which this city was known at various times were Uplesh Pattan, Urkesh, Melpur Pattan and Navmeri. According to an Uplesh publication written in 14th Century, Shree Ratna Prabhu...
Posted: 11.03.2011
 
The Jaina Sect of the Yapaniya Apart from the Digambaras and the Svetambaras there was, in the past another sect of the Jains. This sect, known as the Yapaniya existed in Karnataka at least from the 5th to the 14th century. This we know from the epigraphic evidence. The first and the last inscriptions that mention them and which have been discovered so far, belong to these centuries respectively and all the...
Posted: 01.03.2011
 
History of Shvetambar Terapanth Order 1. Beginning of Jainism Jainism is supposed to be the oldest living religion. According to the Jain tradition it was founded by Bhagwan Rishaba in the pre-historical era. Rishabha was the first Jina hence he is often called Adi-natha, the first lord. He is mentioned in most of the Hindu Puranas, i.e. Markandeya, Kurma, Vayu, Garuda, Brahmanda, Varaha, Linga, Vishnu, Skandha...
Posted: 17.02.2011
 
History of Digambara Jains The history of the Digambara church after Mahavira can generally be divided into four periods. These periods differ from one another not because each of them necessarily has any special characteristic, but mainly because each of the preceding period from the last is shrouded in more and more obscurity, with the result that we know practically nothing substantial about the first of...
Posted: 11.02.2011
 
History of Shvetambara Jains The Shvetambaras, as a distinctly separate church developed only after the Valabhi Council. The Council was held in the year 980 (or 993) after the death of Mahavira (about the middle of the 5th century A.D) for the purpose of collecting the sacred texts and for reducing them to writing. It was presided over by Devarddhi Kshamasramana. An important work of this period was the...

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