Posted: 19.04.2016
By Dr. Peter Flügel
Depiction of the council of Valabhī in the memorial temple Valabhīpura Tīrtha, 2010. Photo: Peter Flügel Śvetāmbara Jaina mendicants peregrinate in small groups from village to village without much contact with other members of their own order. Gatherings for special purposes or general assemblies are held only sporadically, when matters of common concern are to be resolved. An exception is the...
Posted: 06.03.2016
By Dr. Peter Flügel
ESSENCE OF RIGHT BELIEF The Loṅkāgaccha tradition still exists today in small pockets in Gujarāt. Yet, the contemporary followers of the Loṅkāgaccha remember nothing of Loṅkā or his teachings anymore, and have only the vaguest idea of the recent history of their tradition. Not even Loṅkā's name is mentioned in their few idiosyncratic rituals. With two negligible exceptions, most of the modern texts...
Posted: 05.03.2016
By Dr. Peter Flügel
The Unknown Loṅkā Tradition and the Cultural Unconscious In the last two decades, the main focus of Jaina research has shifted from the effectively a-historical exploration of the language, content and form of the Śvetāmbara canon in particular, to the historical and anthropological investigation of "strategies of transmission" of tradition, including "canonisation" and "transformation" (Bruhn 1987:...
Posted: 04.03.2016
By Dr. Peter Flügel
LOṄKĀ'S THIRTY-FOUR PROCLAMATIONS The second manuscript, No. 4121, contains only one text, Luṅkā nī Huṇḍī 34 Bol (=LH), Loṅkā's list of thirty-four assertions, which gives thirty-three examples from the commentaries for significant deviations from the scriptures under the label of apavāda, or exception. The statements No. 1-25 criticise various points of the Niśītha Cūrṇī, which cannot be...
Posted: 03.03.2016
By Dr. Peter Flügel
Part 3: 2.2 The Conversion of the Merchant Banārasīdās A brief glance at the description of the 'conversion' of the seventeenth century merchant and mystic Banārasīdās from Śaivism (the religion of the kings) to Jainism (the religion of his ancestors) in the Ardhakathānaka shall, finally, help to illustrate the pervasiveness of conceptions like those implicit in the Śālibhadracarita. There are...
Posted: 02.03.2016
By Dr. Peter Flügel
Part 2: 2 Two Stories We have seen so far that conversion is presented in medieval Jain stories as a general narrative motif employed by Jain ascetics to influence their audience and to stimulate real conversion experiences. In order to demonstrate the applicability of our theory, I now turn to the analysis of two cases of biographical narratives whose plots focus on the interaction between kings and...
Posted: 01.03.2016
By Dr. Peter Flügel
Part 1 Worshipping the Ideal King On the Social Implications of Jaina Conversion Stories Peter Flügel The differences between history, hagiology and mythology are deliberately blurred in Jaina (Jain) literature. Not only biographies and universal histories, the caritras and purāṇas, and monastic chronicles and genealogies, the sthavirāvalīs, paṭṭāvalīs and gurvāvalīs, mix or combine...
Posted: 19.02.2016
By Dr. Peter Flügel
— VIII — In this essay, I proposed a theoretical interpretation of syncretic processes as forms of symbolic communication, broadly following Habermas' analyses of systematically distorted and latent strategic action, predicated on the work of Grice and sociolinguists such as Hymes, Gumperz, Fishman and Brown and Levinson. The advantage of this perspective, compared to classical hermeneutics, is that social...
Posted: 19.02.2016
By Dr. Peter Flügel
— VII — Although Jain ascetics use the vernacular of their local followers, and reject the Brāhmaṇical idea of the intrinsic sacredness of certain words (MDhŚ 4.256), they do maintain a clear distinction between religious and non-religious ways of USING a given language, that is, the intrinsic structural (not metaphysical) features, intentions and functions of an expression. In accordance with their basic...
Posted: 18.02.2016
By Dr. Peter Flügel
— V — Any empirical analysis of conversational implicatures requires a careful description of the discursive field and conventional ways of speaking in different 'speech situations' which form part of the 'communicative competence' (HYMES (1972b)) and 'repertoire' of the members of a particular 'speech community' (GUMPERZ (1964), (1972)). From an observer's point of view, there are four formal contexts, or...
Posted: 17.02.2016
By Dr. Peter Flügel
In contrast to earlier Jainological emphasis on the unchanging and dogmatic nature of doctrinal Jainism, recent historical-philological and anthropological scholarship focuses predominately on historically changing, syncretic and hybrid features of Jain beliefs and practices, and on the role of agency in the construction of socioreligious identity. Contrary to culturalist self-images and academic...
Posted: 10.02.2016
By Dr. Peter Flügel
Historical Sources on the Loṅkāgaccha- and Sthānakavāsī-Traditions in Johannes Klatt's Jaina-Onomasticon Johannes Klatt, Jaina Onomasticon. Berlin 1893 (Manuscript Bound in Eight Volumes. Hamburg, Institut für Indologie und Tibetologie) In the absence of extensive archaeological evidence, monastic chronologies and hagiographies, inscriptions and the information in the colophons of handwritten or printed...
Posted: 11.05.2013
 
Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften Institut für Kultur- und Geistesgeschichte Asiens Piotr Balcerowicz The Beginnings of Jainism and Ājīvikism Datum: Mo., 13. Mai, 17 Uhr Ort: Institut für Kultur- und Geistesgeschichte Asiens , Seminarraum 1 Apostelgasse 23, 1030 Wien Organisation: Ernst Prets (IKGA) Thema/ Topic There is some evidence that the beginnings of Jainism could not be properly...
Posted: 06.12.2012
By Steven M. Vose
Bhakti , Jains, and the Periyapurā ṇ am in Telling Early Medieval Tamil History (7th to 12th c.) The Periyapurā ṇ am , a twelfth-century Tamil hagiography from South India, recounts episodes from the lives of the sixty-three Śaiva poet-saints ( nāya ṉ mār s), who embody the highest ideals of devotion ( bhakti ) to Śiva. A major theme in this work by Cēkkiḻār, a Cōḻa court minister to King...
Posted: 31.10.2012
By Dr. Vilas Adinath Sangave
Rise of the Tradition The Bhaṭṭāraka tradition is a very well established tradition of sufficiently long duration and prestige found among the Digambara Jainas of different parts of India. The Bhaṭṭāraka was a special type of religious authority evolved by the Digambara Jainas during the early part of the medieval period as a policy of survival to meet the severe challenges created by the advent of...
Posted: 22.09.2011
By Hermann Jacobi
The paper by Hermann Jacobi was published in Indian Antiquary (Vol. 9, 1880, pp. 158-163). In terms of research history this essay is of special importance since the author accentuates Jainism as an independent religion instead of a Buddhist heresy, as it was described by many contemporary scholars. On Mahāvīra and his Predecessors [158] In the Indian Antiquary, vol. VIII, p. 311, a paper on the Six Tirthakas...
Posted: 27.02.2011
By Hawon Ku
International Journal of Jaina Studies (Online) Vol. 7, No. 2 (2011) 1-22 Abstract Śatruñjaya, located in Gujarat, India, is one of the most significant pilgrimage sites for Śvetāmbara Jains, who comprise the majority of Jains in western India. However, only during the 19 th century the site acquired its current form, with more than 150 temples remaining on the site. The concentrated patronage during...
Posted: 27.01.2011
By Dr. Peter Flügel
32 Jain Monastic Life A Quantitative Study of the Terāpanth Śvetāmbara Mendicant Order One of the most neglected areas of research in Asian religions is the sociology of monastic orders. This is surprising, given the pivotal importance of organised asceticism for contemporary Jain, Buddhist and Hindu traditions. Jain mendicant orders are the oldest surviving monastic traditions of the world. Today, they...
Posted: 25.01.2011
By Dr. Andrea Luithle-Hardenberg
31 The “99fold” Pilgrimage to Shatrunjaya A case study of young women’s embodiment of Jaina tradition Introduction On occasion of this felicitation volume for Professor Hampanaji, who has dedicated his life’s work to the study of Jainism, I would like to raise the question how this age-old and apparently austere religion is continued by the younger generations. As a social and cultural anthropologist I...
Posted: 21.01.2011
By Prof. Dr. John Cort
30 The Goddesses of Sravana Belgola * The pilgrimage shrine of Sravana Belgola is, without a doubt, one of the best-known sacred sites of the Jains, and its 58-foot tall colossal icon of Bāhubali, carved out of the very rock in the late tenth century, is one of the sculptural wonders of the world.
Posted: 20.01.2011
By Eva-Maria Glasbrenner
29 The Gommaṭeśvara’s Grand Mahāmastakābhiṣeka Ritual “Aisthetics of Religion” as a new Method of Research of Jaina Ritual "Religionsästhetik" or "Religionsaisthetik" is the German term for a new development within the study of religion. It has slowly been evolving during the last decade in German discourses of studies of religion. This aisthetics of religion has already gained some popularity and...
Posted: 19.01.2011
By Prof. Dr. Aloka Parasher-Sen
28 Renunciation and Pilgrimage in Jainism Perspectives from the Deccan “Tirthayatra brings an end to a number of beginnings, success in money, devotion of sangha, fortune for good people, renovation of old chaityas, development of tirthas. It helps in following the sayings of tirthankaras in correct way, bringing moksha closer and gaining higher status of human and god” (Jnanavijayaji, Upadeshtarangini...
Posted: 30.12.2010
By Prof. Kim Plofker
International Journal of Jaina Studies (Online) Vol. 6, No. 5 (2010) 1-13 Kim Plofker Department of Mathematics, Union College, Schenectady NY, USA. A version of this paper was delivered at the 9th Jaina Studies Workshop, “Jainism and Modernity” (22 March 2007, School of Oriental and African Studies, London). Abstract In the cross-fertilization between Islamic and traditional Indian exact...
Posted: 29.12.2010
By Dr. Choodamani Nandagopal
15 Dance and Music in Jaina Literature With special Reference to Kannada Literature With deep respect and gratitude I offer this research article to SVASTI: Festschrift to Prof. Nagarajayya Hampa, the distinguished scholar in Jaina studies. It is an honour for me to contribute in this prestigious volume dedicated to him. It is our sincere wishes that his service to Kannada literature in general and to Jaina...
Posted: 27.12.2010
By Prof. Dr. Willem Bollée
13 Remarks on the Cultural History of the Ear in India Jiṇṇo ‘ham asmi... savanaṃ na phāsu (Suttanipāta 1120) 1.0 Hearing is the first active sense in mammals, in humans even two months before birth,[1] and its great significance in Indian literature compared with other senses, especially seeing, is amply shown by a plethora of associations. Since the R̥gveda one hears either with karṇa, which has...
Posted: 30.07.2010
By Prof. Dr. John Cort
International Journal of Jaina Studies (Online) Vol. 6, No. 2 (2010) 1-45 John E. Cort An earlier version of this essay was presented at the 13th World Sanskrit Conference in Edinburgh, July 12, 2006. My thanks to Paul Dundas, Peter Flügel, Kristi Wiley, and J. B. Shah for their assistance. All translations are mine, unless noted otherwise.ons are mine, unless noted otherwise. In this essay I use the...
Posted: 23.02.2010
By Bal Patil
At the outset I extend my grateful thanks to the very kind invitation extended by Dr.Andrea Luithle-Hardenberg and her very concerned efforts to persuade me to attend this distinguished International Tuebingen Workshop on a very important topic The Jaina and the British. However owing to my physical disability I would not be able to make the trip to the University of Tuebingen to participate in this important...
Posted: 14.11.2009
By Bal Patil
The Jains scattered across Tamil Nadu are originally from Mysore, senior writer Ham Pa Nagarajaiah said on Tuesday. Some of the manuscripts published in TN recently have traced the origins of the community settled there to Mysore, which, he said, is being discussed in academic circles. Speaking after inaugurating a day-long meet on Jainology hosted by the University of Mysore, Hampana stated: some 89...
Posted: 12.11.2009
 
MYSORE (TOI): The Jains scattered across Tamil Nadu are originally from Mysore, senior writer Ham Pa Nagarajaiah said on Tuesday. Some of the manuscripts published in TN recently have traced the origins of the community settled there to Mysore, which, he said, is being discussed in academic circles. Speaking after inaugurating a day-long meet on Jainology hosted by the University of Mysore, Hampana stated: some...
Posted: 13.08.2009
By Dr. Max Deeg, Prof. Dr. Iain Gardner
International Journal of Jaina Studies (Online) Vol. 5, No. 2 (2009) 1-30 PDF, Indian Influence on Mani Reconsidered: The Case of Jainism In 2005 Iain Gardner published an article with the title: "Some comments on Mani and Indian religions according to the Coptic Kephalaia ". The most important reference point for the following paper is that he argued that some of the terms found in the Coptic text (...
Posted: 31.03.2008
By Dr. Jonardon Ganeri
International Journal of Jaina Studies (Online) Vol. 4, No. 1 (2008) 1-11 Abstract The Jaina philosopher Yaśovijaya Gaṇi (c.1608-1688 CE) lived during a period of exceptional socio-philosophical interest, one in which the world of traditional Sanskrit discourse found itself in an encounter with the new intellectual world of the Mughal empire. One might well imagine how these circumstances would...
Posted: 21.04.2004
By Bal Patil
Paper Read In Conference on Religions in Indic Civilisation New Delhi December 18 -21, 2003 Organised by Centre for the Study of Developing Societies in collaboration with International Association for the History of Religions and India International Centre, New Delhi

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