Posted: 10.01.2016
By Dr. Manju Nahata
Description of the painting ‘Swapna: Satya’ (‘Dream: Reality’) according to the sixteenth chapter of Bhagavatisutra: Shraman Mahavira before attaining kevala-gyana or the supreme knowledge dreamt ten dreams in the temple of Shulpani Yaksha at Asthika village. He dreamt ten dreams. Among these ten dreams, the third dream was of a male-cuckoo with strange wings, and by seeing it, he became...
Posted: 19.07.2015
 
Now we come to some other philosophies where we can find aspects of Anekāntavāda. This concept is primarily based on Śakti-Śiva principle, where a female stands for Śakti and a male for Śiva, each having the same contribution at the root of the world. The Ardhanārīśwaramūrti (icon) is one of the eight forms of the Lord Śiva. What strikes me most about the Ardhanārīśwaramūrti is its aesthetic...
Posted: 18.07.2015
By Dr. Manju Nahata
Well, after understanding the axioms of Anekāntavāda in short with the help of paintings, we will try to understand this wonderful philosophy from different perspectives. Until and unless we see the practical view of a philosophy in our daily lives, it can never prove its utility. Happiness and sorrow are the two antonymous states of our mind. In this painting, the sky has been used as a backdrop to symbolise...
Posted: 17.07.2015
By Dr. Manju Nahata
The most important aspect of the philosophy is that it allows opposites to enter into its purview. This is to say that it is based on a system of opposition. Here I will show 4 contradictory pairs to mention the axioms of Anekantavada. They are: Nitya /Anitya (Permanence / Impermanence) Asti /Nāsti (Existence / Non-existence) Eka /Aneka (One /Many) Bheda /Abheda (Different /Identical) The 1st axiom of...
Posted: 16.07.2015
By Dr. Manju Nahata
Now quickly let’s have a glance on the Agamic origin of Anekantavada - In Jain religion, tradition has it that the first Tīrthaṅkara of avasarpinī kāla, Lord Rsabhanātha, is the originator of anekāntavāda. We do not find the word Anekānta anywhere in Jain canonical literature called 'Aagams', but the pure essence of Anekāntavāda, Syadvada is present throughout. Nothing has been explained devoid of...
Posted: 15.07.2015
By Dr. Manju Nahata
Now a question arises that why I have chosen the medium of painting to express Anekāntavāda. We are clear that according to anekāntavāda, truth has many aspects, while language has such limitation as it can throw light upon only an aspect of truth at a time. Therefore, in this case it is impossible to say two contradictory things at a time. On the other hand, the scope of paintings as a medium of expression...
Posted: 14.07.2015
By Dr. Manju Nahata
Anekāntavāda is regarded as the central philosophy of Jainism. This is a theory of many sidedness of reality and truth. The identity of real is not contradicted by the possession of varying attributes. Reality according to Jains is permanent in the midst of changes. It means that things must not be judged from one point of view, as it has many aspects. The derivative meaning of the word anekāntavāda given...
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