Abstract Thinking: [10.03] Bhavana Of Dissociation - A Process Of Evacuation

Published: 18.12.2006
Updated: 06.10.2008

One question is often raised in the field of religion: Does religion offer any method of purgation? As it is, religion teaches suppression. It says "Quash your anger, curb your lust, suppress your fear and inhibit your ego". Religion only talks in terms of suppression. But this is not true. Religion has never taught suppression. Instead, religion offers the dissociation. Dissociation means, evacuation, emptying down. Expel what is accumulated inside - that is dissociation. To squeeze it out so that not only the previous accumulation is liquidated, but the very mechanism of accumulation is destroyed forever.

When a bird's wings are filled with dust, it shakes them so as to fling off all the particles of dust. Similarly, give your organism such a shaking that all tension is ended, totally expelled, evacuated. That is the process of dissociation. It is not only a process of ending tension created by anger or fear, but of dissolving the very mechanism by which anger and fear come into being. Through such a process alone, can the upward movement of energy, the purity of the mental dispositions, and the states of dharmya-meditation and shukla-meditation be achieved.

The principal factor of dissociation is penance. Through penance, three things are accomplished:

  1. Greater accumulation of energy
  2. Less expenditure of energy
  3. Vertical movement of energy

Thereupon, the sadhak establishes a direct contract with the conflux of light. The insignificant ray of "I am" merges into the conflux of light. The "I" disappears altogether; only the conflux remains. All the scattered rays, which earlier filtered out of a netted cover, now get merged into the great conflux of light. With this, the question of a person directly experiencing the conflux of light dissolves of itself, for the very distinction between a single ray and the conflux is ended. The individual merges with the whole. Nothing remains but the splendour of light.

Sources
  • Abstract Thinking
    by Acharya Mahaprajna, © 1988
  • Edited by  Muni Dulheraj
  • Translated by Muni Mahendra Kumar
  • Published by Jain Vishva Barati
  • Edition 1999 compiled by Samani Stith Pragya

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  1. Anger
  2. Fear
  3. Sadhak
  4. The Splendour
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